all-encompassingly

we still remember mitch hedberg

A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

May 27th 2004

i think the grief is getting to mr. berg

you don’t want to fault the man. he lost his son in a most disgusting and despicable manner. but he seems to have lost it. he seems to have found, in his sons murder by the servants of allah, that america is the great satan.

capt.pajk10105140127.american_beheaded_family_pajk101.jpg

read michael berg’s article here. but let me treat you to a few highlights, just in case you want the quick case for the man’s insanity. paragraph 2:

People ask me why I focus on putting the blame for my son’s tragic and atrocious end on the Bush administration. They ask: “Don’t you blame the five men who killed him?” I have answered that I blame them no more or less than the Bush administration, but I am wrong: I am sure, knowing my son, that somewhere during their association with him these men became aware of what an extraordinary man my son was. I take comfort that when they did the awful thing they did, they weren’t quite as in to it as they might have been. I am sure that they came to admire him.

they weren’t as in to it. hmmm. did you hear them screeching “god is great?” i don’t think they were reluctant killers, somehow forced to commit the act.

they came to admire your son. you are living in a fantasy world, sir.

Donald Rumsfeld said that he took responsibility for the sexual abuse of Iraqi prisoners. How could he take that responsibility when there was no consequence? Nick took the consequences.

one may take responsibility by correcting the situation. for example, rumsfeld may be assuring that those who committed the abuses will be courts martialed. no one can determine who the terrorists will choose to target with their hate. see september 11, 2001, where 3000 people from many nations and religions were killed indiscriminately. fanatic muslims have been conquering infidels since their beginning. our policies are not the root of the problem.

So what were we to do when we in America were attacked on September 11, that infamous day? I say we should have done then what we never did before: stop speaking to the people we labelled our enemies and start listening to them. Stop giving preconditions to our peaceful coexistence on this small planet, and start honouring and respecting every human’s need to live free and autonomously, to truly respect the sovereignty of every state. To stop making up rules by which others must live and then separate rules for ourselves.

this is a great philosophy. for example, it probably would have been really good with the nazis. “uh, why do you fellows want to kill 6 million people? could you nice nazis please explain the importance of world conquest to me?” they’d answer with some unbending fascist doctrine and what could we respond? “oh, okay! i understand you now!” like the nazis, these muslim extremists cannot be reasoned with. we have over 1000 years of history to support this point. we’ve got to worry about our safety first–before we honor their ‘autonomy’.

My son’s work still goes on. Where there was one peacemaker before, I now see and have heard from thousands of peacemakers. Nick was a man who acted on his beliefs. We, the people of this world, now need to act on our beliefs.

michael berg makes it sound like his son was in iraq as a human shield or something. he wants us to honor nick’s legacy by opposing the bush administration. but who does he think we are? all the news reports told us his son was a bush supporter. i cannot imagine anything more disrespectful to a dead relative than to purposefully misrepresent their views to score some relatively unimportant political points. your son just died, man. he’s not just another dimebag of your favorite green herb; he will not be back next weekend. give politics a break for awhile and honor your son’s life.

the whole berg letter is an example of how to draw bad conclusions and sound like a whiny, confused peacnic. i recommend you read it slowly, so you can really take it all in. [link]. i’ve also copied and pasted it below.

– – – – – – – – – –

George Bush never looked into Nick’s eyes

Even more than the murderers who took my son’s life, I condemn those who make policies to end lives

Michael Berg
Friday May 21, 2004
The Guardian

My son, Nick, was my teacher and my hero. He was the kindest, gentlest man I know; no, the kindest, gentlest human being I have ever known. He quit the Boy Scouts of America because they wanted to teach him to fire a handgun. Nick, too, poured into me the strength I needed, and still need, to tell the world about him.

People ask me why I focus on putting the blame for my son’s tragic and atrocious end on the Bush administration. They ask: “Don’t you blame the five men who killed him?” I have answered that I blame them no more or less than the Bush administration, but I am wrong: I am sure, knowing my son, that somewhere during their association with him these men became aware of what an extraordinary man my son was. I take comfort that when they did the awful thing they did, they weren’t quite as in to it as they might have been. I am sure that they came to admire him.

I am sure that the one who wielded the knife felt Nick’s breath on his hand and knew that he had a real human being there. I am sure that the others looked into my son’s eyes and got at least a glimmer of what the rest of the world sees. And I am sure that these murderers, for just a brief moment, did not like what they were doing.

George Bush never looked into my son’s eyes. George Bush doesn’t know my son, and he is the worse for it. George Bush, though a father himself, cannot feel my pain, or that of my family, or of the world that grieves for Nick, because he is a policymaker, and he doesn’t have to bear the consequences of his acts. George Bush can see neither the heart of Nick nor that of the American people, let alone that of the Iraqi people his policies are killing daily.

Donald Rumsfeld said that he took responsibility for the sexual abuse of Iraqi prisoners. How could he take that responsibility when there was no consequence? Nick took the consequences.

Even more than those murderers who took my son’s life, I can’t stand those who sit and make policies to end lives and break the lives of the still living.

Nick was not in the military, but he had the discipline and dedication of a soldier. Nick Berg was in Iraq to help the people without any expectation of personal gain. He was only one man, but through his death he has become many. The truly unselfish spirit of giving your all to do what you know in your own heart is right even when you know it may be dangerous; this spirit has spread among the people who knew Nick, and that group has spread and is spreading all over the world.

So what were we to do when we in America were attacked on September 11, that infamous day? I say we should have done then what we never did before: stop speaking to the people we labelled our enemies and start listening to them. Stop giving preconditions to our peaceful coexistence on this small planet, and start honouring and respecting every human’s need to live free and autonomously, to truly respect the sovereignty of every state. To stop making up rules by which others must live and then separate rules for ourselves.

George Bush’s ineffective leadership is a weapon of mass destruction, and it has allowed a chain reaction of events that led to the unlawful detention of my son which immersed him in a world of escalated violence. Were it not for Nick’s detention, I would have had him in my arms again. That detention held him in Iraq not only until the atrocities that led to the siege of Fallujah, but also the revelation of the atrocities committed in the jails in Iraq, in retaliation for which my son’s wonderful life was put to an end.

My son’s work still goes on. Where there was one peacemaker before, I now see and have heard from thousands of peacemakers. Nick was a man who acted on his beliefs. We, the people of this world, now need to act on our beliefs. We need to let the evildoers on both sides of the Atlantic know that we are fed up with war. We are fed up with the killing and bombing and maiming of innocent people. We are fed up with the lies. Yes, we are fed up with the suicide bombers, and with the failure of the Israelis and Palestinians to find a way to stop killing each other. We are fed up with negotiations and peace conferences that are entered into on both sides with preset conditions that preclude the outcome of peace. We want world peace now.

Many have offered to pray for Nick and my family. I appreciate their thoughts, but I ask them to include in their prayers a prayer for peace. And I ask them to do more than pray. I ask them to demand peace now.

—-
Michael Berg is the father of Nick Berg, the US contractor beheaded on video in Iraq this month by a group believed to be linked to al-Qaida. This is an extract from his message of support for the Stop The War Coalition’s demonstration, End the Torture – Bring the Troops Home Now, which will be held at 11am tomorrow at the Embankment in London

6 Responses to “i think the grief is getting to mr. berg”

  1. I’m having a real problem trying to conclude that Michael Berg is not a Stalinist. He seems to be devoid of any logical, ethical, or moral compass and uses his son’s death to advance socialist ideas and to foster hatred for the President, specifically, and America, generally. I could be wrong since I’m not an expert on the nuances of utopianism, but I’m sure he fits into the Marxist lexicon somewhere.

  2. Michael Berg is related to Al Gore. Simple as that. Both suffer from severe mental problems…because they are Democrats

  3. Doug

    He is a father mourning his son as he sees fit.

    Everyone should let the man be. The media should stop paying so much attention to him. As conservatives we would be wise to do the same.

  4. travis

    he wrote this for the guardian. it is not an intrusive interview, it’s not an E true hollywood story, it’s not a ken starr investigation. terrorists killed michael berg’s son and he has publicly called on the united states of america to cease and desist in it’s ‘unjust’ war on terror. nobody’s bothering him while he’s grieving. instead, in his son’s death, he’s found his calling in life: to get john kerry elected and protect militant islam’s peaceful ‘autonomy’.

    give me a break, doug. pull the bean out of your butt.

  5. Like others who use the profound, unimaginable sorry of Michael Berg, Cindy Sheehan and the like in service of advancing their own ideology, your post is a chilling reminder of the utter hypocrisy and moral bankruptcy so common in today’s political discourse. Blather all you like, but the fact is that you’ve succeeded only in sullying the heartfelt actions of a grieving parent while contributing precisely nothing by way of a positive agenda. Congratulations.

  6. please, spare us the melodrama. eg: “profound, unimaginable sorry [sic],” “chilling reminder,” “utter hipocrisy and moral bankruptcy,” “blather,” sullying the heartfelt actions of a grieving parent,” etc

    both berg’s and sheehan’s sons were in iraq as a result of their own choices. neither was drafted, for example. nick berg was not even in the military. george bush didn’t kill them. muslim extremists did. george bush didn’t want them to die, muslim extremists did. george bush didn’t laughingly exclaim, “god is great” as he watched them pass from this life to the next, muslim extremists did.

    i certainly don’t fault mr. berg or ms. sheehan for grieving. but their opinions do not automatically become unimpeachable because they have had to deal with sorrow. they have made unreasonable statements. they blame george bush for their son’s deaths, but freely forgive the people that actually did the slaughtering.

    that is ridiculous. and that is my simple point.

    please address that hipocrisy before you shower me with your waterfall of outrage phrases (noted above).